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In 2014, Asensetek accepted LUX REVIEW’s an exclusive interview in Hong Kong Lighting Fair, this exclusive interview reports could already be viewed on LUX REVIEW’s website. More information, please visit the URL below, and we thank LUX REVIEW’s professional reports.

Complete Coverage: http://www.asensetek.com/reports/luxreview_1.pdf

LUX REVIEW’s Reports Abstract:

One of the most exciting products on show at October’s Hong Kong International Lighting Fair was not a lamp, luminaire or even a control system, but a gadget that lets you measure light with your smartphone.

Before you roll your eyes and turn the page, this is not a gimmicky app that tries to use your phone’s camera or built-in light sensor to make hopelessly off-the-mark measurements.

Lighting Passport, created by three-year-old Taiwanese firm Asensetek, is a separate piece of hardware, with its own sensor and patented spectral engine, that clips on to the end of an Apple or Android phone (or you can carry it around separately, as long as the battery lasts and you keep your phone within Bluetooth range). Download the free app, and you’re good to go.

The device can measure all the key things – colour temperature, colour rendering (for colours R1-R15), light output, peak intensity, and illuminance. There are settings for measuring single or multiple light sources, or for continuous measurements over a period of time.

You can assess uniformity, check for blue light hazard, compare spectral composition to a reference source, and export or email data to share the results. Your colleagues can download the free app so they can examine the numbers too – even if they don’t have a Lighting Passport themselves.

Checking the numbers
Wang says: ‘There are 2,400 exhibitors here at the Hong Kong show. Everybody has sample products, they all send their things for testing. But not many buyers test the spec. They just ask, ‘How much?’ I go round sometimes and check people’s numbers. They are stunned!’ He created Lighting Passport, he says, to fill ‘communication gaps’ in the LED lighting industry.

‘From a vendor’s point of view, I think there are a few figures that show good lighting has been achieved: 170lm/W, 200lm/$, CRI of >80… then you’re satisfied.’ On the production side, companies that make LED packages or chips all use different bins, but when they make an end product, it’s expressed the same to their customer, for example 3000K or CRI 80… but they all look different.’

‘R&D people usually have an integrating sphere, but that doesn’t help in the field, and the results are not quick. Integrating spheres can’t be used in a mass production line – they’re only for R&D people.’

But how do the results from Lighting Passport compare with the results from a sphere in terms of accuracy? It’s a question Wang is familiar with. All Lighting Passports are calibrated using equipment that meets the standards set by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology for traceability of measurements.

Asensetek guarantees accuracy of ±0.002 for chromaticity, ±3 per cent for illuminance and ±2 per cent for colour temperature. The optical resolution is eight to 10 nanometers. The product is certified by labs in China, Taiwan and Switzerland, says Wang.

‘The measurement results are different because the measurement conditions are different – in a sphere, light is totally reflected and uniform, while Lighting Passport measures the true ambient light of a light source where it is. On-site measurement results are really important for what people will actually perceive. We don’t want to replace the integrating sphere. It’s a different technology. My previous employer made very good integrating spheres, but that’s not what we chose to do.’

‘We called it Lighting Passport, because it lets people in,’ says Wang. ‘Everybody who uses lighting deserves to understand this stuff. People need it. They shouldn’t be lied to or perplexed.’

Lighting Passport is not just for lighting industry people, says Wang, it’s for ‘anyone who cares about the quality of lighting and how good their product or service looks’. For instance…

1. Farmers can use Lighting Passport to help tune artificial light to encourage optimum plant growth.

2. Luxury retailers are showing an interest in the product to assess lighting in their stores – Asensetek says it is already in talks with one of the top brands in Europe.

3. TV broadcasters can use Lighting Passport to check the quality of light on set. Japan’s national broadcaster NHK is already a customer.

4. Hollywood moviemakers hope to cut post-production costs by making sure they get the light quality right first time. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has developed an app, and major producers of cameras, filters and lighting are also Lighting Passport fans.

5. Apple uses the Lighting Passport tool to check lighting quality in its Apple Stores in the US – presumably its compatibility with the iPhone was part of the attraction.

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